Tag: free press

by Julie Keck

1. The entrenched digital divide in our own backyards (Pui-Wing Tam / New York Times) 2. Open government is meaningless without a free press (Joel Simon / Columbia Journalism Review) 3. Entire editorial staff of Elsevier journal Lingua resigns over high price, lack of open access (Glyn Moody / Ars Technica) 4. Essena O’Neill: “You […] more »

by Stephen J. A. Ward

How does a society deal with what it considers to be unethical use of the freedom to publish? Dictators imprison journalists. Democracies use a mix of legal and non-legal mechanisms, from libel laws to press councils. In the United States, journalists have long countered calls for greater legal regulation by appealing to an ethical ideal […] more »

by Julie Keck

1. New York Times internal report painted dire digital picture (Myles Tanzer / BuzzFeed) 2. Free Press’ Timothy Karr on protecting net neutrality (92nd Street Y) 3. FCC votes for Internet “fast lanes” but could change its mind later (Jon Brodkin / Ars Technica) 4. Europe: Digital companies demand new Google anti-trust probe (Channel NewAsia) […] more »

by Jonathan Peters

Edson C. Tandoc, Jr., a Fulbright Scholar at the Missouri School of Journalism, co-authored this post. Earlier this month we published a scholarly article in Quorum, the online edition of the N.Y.U. Journal of Legislation and Public Policy, exploring the definition of a journalist. We culled a variety of sources that conceptualize a journalist in […] more »

by Jillian C. York

Eskinder Nega is an Ethiopian journalist and blogger who, in July 2012, was convicted under the country’s broad anti-terrorism law and sentenced to 18 years in prison for exercising his right to free expression.  Nega’s conviction has been roundly condemned: by the United Nations, the Committee to Protect Journalists, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, and numerous […] more »

by Mark Glaser

If you consider the level of ethical breaches, law-breaking, cozying with politicians and police, the British press comes off as a chaotic mess in the phone-hacking scandal. Something must be done! After nine months of investigating and studying the matter, Lord Justice Leveson delivered a nearly 2,000 page report, saying the U.K. needs more stringent […] more »

by Mourad Teyeb

The following is an opinion piece by Tunisian freelance contributor Mourad Teyeb: The elections of October 23, 2011, were by all means historic for Tunisia and the whole Arab region. It was for the first time in their history that Tunisians had a democratically elected Parliament, made of a variety of political parties and views. […] more »

by Danny O'Brien

Russia’s State Duma has passed a number of new laws in the past week, all seemingly aimed at reining in civil society and criticism of public figures. The bills would re-criminalize defamation and impose limits and labels on NGOs. They follow last month’s introduction of excessive fines for unauthorized protests. Government Crackdown Heightens One of […] more »

by Andy Yee

In the U.S. House Committee on Foreign Affairs in early March of this year, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton admitted that her country is losing the “information war,” naming China’s CCTV, along with Al Jazeera and Russia Today, as key rivals. “During the Cold War we did a great job in getting America’s message out. […] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

In honour of the Expo Shanghai China, the biggest display of Chinese might since the 2008 Olympic Games, Reporters Without Borders is inviting Internet users to visit a page on its website, the “Garden of Freedoms,” that’s dedicated to the freedoms that are often oppressed in China. Hundreds of countries, regions and corporations are participating […] more »