Tag: egypt

by Cathy Yungmann

It seems that providing students with the opportunity for global education experiences is currently a major initiative in higher education. The benefits of preparing college students — especially journalism students — to become global citizens through international contacts are obvious. Some educators are calling it “internationalization.” But a recent report claims that the numbers of […] more »

by Devin Harner

Editor’s Note: This story includes updates at the bottom, and a correction. Note to young, and professional, journalists alike. Don’t get “Sam Baciled” (pronounced, appropriately, like bamboozled) — particularly not when you’re reporting on acts of terrorism in the Middle East, during an election year, on the anniversary of September 11. In the aftermath of […] more »

by Anne Nelson

Search for the term “international media development” and you won’t find many university departments or publications. Nonetheless, the field is over 50 years old and has exerted a major influence on many regions of the world, accounting for a budget of half a billion dollars a year. The Center for International Media Assistance, a Congressionally-funded […] more »

by Alessandra Bajec

In the 18 days of Egypt’s uprising that began on Jan. 25, 2011 and ended with the resignation of former President Hosni Mubarak, thousands of Egyptians turned to their cell phones, digital cameras or social media sites to document the events as they were unfolding in Cairo and across the country. Tapping into this wealth […] more »

by Jillian C. York

This piece is co-authored by Trevor Timm. In its six years of existence, Twitter has staked out a position as the most free speech-friendly social network. Its utility in the uprisings that swept the Middle East and North Africa is unmatched, its usage by activists and journalists alike to spread news and galvanize the public […] more »

by Mark Glaser

How do people end up in the streets protesting something? What motivates them to take action, even when that action could lead to their arrest? Last year, Facebook and Twitter played major roles in helping organize street protests during the Arab Spring, to the point where dictators were focused on either blocking the services or […] more »

by Mark Glaser

Jillian York Welcome to the 38th episode of “The Mediatwits,” the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift’s Mark Glaser and Jillian York, who is filling in for Rafat Ali. First, we get a special on-the-ground report from special guest Mohamed El Dahshan in Tunisia, talking about a ruling expected from the country’s […] more »

by Tanja Aitamurto

This piece was co-written by Hanna Sistek. CAIRO — The revolution in Egypt is unfinished business. While new online tools are used to strengthen civil society, activists are still struggling with the digital divide when it comes to mobilizing masses against the army and the remains of the old administration. On a Saturday evening in […] more »

by Susannah Vila

Political satire is, historically, a great propeller of social movements. As Srdja Popovic, a leader of Optor, the Serbian resistance movement, said: Everything we did [had] a dosage of humor. Because I’m joking. You’re becoming angry. You’re always showing only one face. And I’m always again with another joke, with another action, with another positive […] more »

by Mark Glaser

Welcome to the second episode of “The Mediatwits,” the new revamped longer form weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift’s Mark Glaser along with PaidContent founder Rafat Ali. This week’s show looks at the repercussions of the $39 billion buyout of T-Mobile USA by AT&T. Rafat has had both services and will stick […] more »